marketing

AWARD | Michelle Sander Media Earns Communication Honors by Michelle Sander

THE 25th ANNUAL COMMUNICATOR AWARDS ANNOUNCES WINNERS Excellence and Distinction award recipients named in New York.

New York, NY – May 7, 2019

The winners of the 25th Annual Communicator Awards have officially been announced by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts.

With over 6,000 entries received from across the US and around the world, the Communicator Awards is the largest and most competitive awards program honoring creative excellence for marketing and communications professionals.

“We are extremely proud to recognize the work received in the 25th Annual Communicator Awards. This class of entries we received this season embody the ever-evolving marketing and communications industry” noted Derek Howard, director of the AIVA. He added, “On behalf of the Academy, I’d like to applaud the entrants this season for their dedication to producing outstanding content as they continue to push the envelope of creativity.”

Winners who received the competition’s highest honor, the Award of Excellence, include the likes of ESPN Films, Forbes Media, PepsiCo, Scorpion, WWE, and Publicis Sapient.

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Michelle Sander Media received an Award of Distinction for Art Direction for Film for their Branding and Production work on the film “Lost Sock Collection,” directed by the poet and filmmaker Eliot Michl. The film had its world premiere at the Manchester International Film Festival in March of this year and has since been selected as an Official Selection at the SHORT To The Point International Film Festival in Bucharest.

“I’m grateful to the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts for this award and for highlighting our work in the field of communication,” said Michelle Sander, Founder of Michelle Sander Media.

If you would like to speak with Michelle about the branding and production of an important project, how to promote yourself or your small business, or how to implement a content strategy that works, send a note on the Contact page.

Michelle Sander is a top content strategist, communicator, and creative director.

Get in touch today to chat about how to build engaging content and strategy for your brand.

 

CONTACT

Visit Michelle Sander Media

About The Communicator Awards

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The Communicator Awards is the leading international awards program honoring creative excellence for marketing and communications professionals. Founded by passionate communications professionals over two decades ago, The Communicator Awards is an annual competition honoring the best digital, mobile, audio, video, and social content the industry has to offer. The Communicator Awards is widely recognized as one of the largest awards of its kind in the world.

The Communicator Awards are judged and overseen by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts (AIVA), a 600+ member organization of leading professionals from various disciplines of the visual arts dedicated to embracing progress and the evolving nature of traditional and interactive media. Current AIVA membership represents a "Who's Who" of acclaimed media, advertising, and marketing firms including: PureMatter, Condè Nast, Disney, Republica, Tinder, MTV, Starbucks, Fast Company, Tribal DDB, Yahoo!, and many others. See aiva.org for more information.

AWARD | Michelle Sander Named Top 200 Content Strategist by Michelle Sander

Congratulations to Michelle Sander for being named to the Top 200 Content Strategists for the second year in a row.

MindTouch evaluated thousands and created a measurement that takes into account a wide range of metrics including internet presence, influence, and community engagement and Michelle Sander made the cut.

The list includes the likes of Google, Airbnb, Meetup, Entrepreneur Magazine, and Microsoft, so Michelle is in some great company.

Content marketing and content marketing strategy aren't terms that everyone is familiar with, so let's take a moment to clarify. Content marketing is the creation and distribution of online material (videos, blogs, and social media posts) that don't explicitly promote a brand, but, instead, stimulate interest in its products or services. The end result is an increase in brand engagement, conversion rates and, ultimately, sales. Creating quality, relevant content is also key in building Search Engine Optimization (SEO).

Content marketing is all about aligning content production to a strategy that is focused on creating devoted followers. Content marketing paired with a solid strategy allows you to create customers and future customers who are die-hard, loyal fans of your brand. 

Content marketing focuses your brand squarely on a target market. Creating quality, impossible-not-to-share content establishes you and your brand as an expert in your respective field, it builds trust, and it creates more opportunities for engagement and ultimately sales opportunities. This is what a good content marketing strategy can do for you and your brand.

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If you need help with your content marketing strategy and how to implement it, send a note on the Contact page. Michelle Sander is one of the top content strategists and she can't wait to chat about how to build engaging content for your brand.

PRESS | Marketing Consulting with Michelle Sander by Michelle Sander

It wasn’t exactly wanderlust that spurred Michelle Sander to set out to work with Marketing clients remotely in Malaysia, then Thailand — with plans to hit several other spots around the globe over the following year.

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This story was originally published in Josephine Magazine

It wasn’t wanderlust because it wasn’t about the places, per se. But even without that traditional motivation, Michelle Sander did have good reason for embracing the adventure.

“For me, traveling is really about the people,” she says. “The idea of collecting people’s stories: That’s what drives me.”

Sander grew up in St. Joseph and graduated from Benton High School before attending the University of Utah on a dance scholarship. She ultimately graduated with a journalism degree, going on to write for various publications before transitioning into marketing and branding.

In the years after college, she remained mainly in Utah before finding herself back home about a year ago. Her dad was sick, and after his passing, she stayed to help her mom — all the while maintaining her marketing career, with her employer allowing her to work remotely.

Although this work situation came about by default, it also came with the epiphany that she could work — and live — just about anywhere in the world.

“Home is where the Wi-fi is,” she says. “As long as you have a good connection, you’re fine.”

Currently, home for her is in Thailand. And her work is with her own business, Michelle Sander Consulting, which helps other businesses discover and communicate their brands.

Sander is with a small group of like-minded world-travelers, many of them also Americans. She notes that they all can be described as location independent or digital nomads or even a little tribe of expats — but not as tourists. And that, really, was a significant part of her aim in choosing this adventure: To experience the world not as a visitor hitting the high points but as a resident getting a real feel for the people and culture of a place.

“It feels like I’m collecting hometowns,” she says, adding that putting down roots for a longer period of time allows for experiences she couldn’t have otherwise — such as an adventure trip to find hidden waterfalls that didn’t turn out as planned, since the rainy season was yet to start and the waterfalls were dry. But in having plenty of time to wander, her group happened upon a breathtaking ocean vista accompanied by a beautiful beach.

“Those are the kind of things you can’t plan for,” Sander says. “They’re what you see when you decide to live in a place for a while.”

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Her travel itinerary thus far, beginning in late August, had her in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, for about a month before moving to Ko Pha Ngan, Thailand, in October. In November, she relocated to the neighboring island of Koh Tao in the Gulf of Thailand, then spent time in Hanoi, Vietnam, before returning to Thailand to spend most of December in Chiang Mai.

Along with several other travelers, she’ll spend Christmas in a castle in Florence, Italy, and will remain in Europe to kick off the new year — with plans to also immerse herself in Portugal and Spain before moving on to the Netherlands.

Of course, as exciting and enriching as all of this is, living in foreign countries while also maintaining a career does come with challenges. In Thailand, for example, the power sometimes goes out — which limits her ability to work and communicate with clients. And even things that are inherently positive, like a workspace with an ocean view, can be a distraction until she’s had a chance to adjust.

Then, of course, are all the issues that can come up when you’re halfway around the world from the comforts and conveniences of your native country. Sander has found, though, that these difficulties often are also opportunities to see the best in others.

“Once you travel, you really see how nice people are,” she says. “Wherever you go, people are keen to help. It really helps establish the idea that we’re all just trying to make our way in the world and help where we can.”

Life-affirming experiences like these provide plenty of inspiration for her other chosen adventure: Writing.

“Whenever I put pen to paper, I never know where it’s going to go,” she says.

She adds that her passion for storytelling plays out not only in her consulting work but also in her personal writing, including a book and a travel blog. Anyone interested in these can follow her Facebook profile at facebook.com/MichelleSanderMedia or visit her website at MichelleSander.com. She also has a business website for her Marketing Consultation services, MichelleSanderMedia.com.

And for those with an urge to follow their own adventures, she has some words of advice.

“Whatever your adventure is, start today,” she says. “You don’t need much; just put your plan in motion, take the first step and keep taking steps day after day.”

As for her next steps, she knows she may not know all the specifics of how her future will pan out — but she does have a great template for shaping it.

“I wouldn’t mind if my future looks like the last few months, over and over again,” she says.

Written by Erin Wisdom

Marketing Stuff Ninja and Communications Rockstar by Michelle Sander

Job titles aren’t just a matter of semantics. They can tell you a lot about what a company values and what it might be like to work with them.

After working on my own startup for a while, the build-measure-learn framework for iterative decision making lodged itself deep into my overall thought processes. Not too many things in my life are left unmeasured or analyzed and now that I have a nice sampling of Job Hunt data, I decided to take a deeper look.

 
Job titles aren’t just a matter of semantics. They can tell you a lot about what a company values and what it might be like to work with them.
 

Since I embarked on my Job Hunt in the marketing and branding space, I have applied for about 50 jobs with various titles to fit my skills and ambitions. Here is the list of job titles as they appeared in alphabetical order.

Associate Manager, Social Content
Communication Manager
Content Marketer and Writer
Content Writer
Creative Digital Designer
Designer
Developer / Marketing Manager
Digital Marketing & Project Manager
Digital Marketing Manager
Digital Product Manager
Director of Growth (remote)
Director of Marketing
Director, Product Management
Executive Marketing Assistant
Growth Hacker
Growth Marketer
Head of Digital Team
Internal Communications Manager
Learning Consultant
Marketing Automation Consultant
Marketing Designer
Marketing Director
Marketing Director Position
Marketing Generalist
Marketing Position
Marketing Product Specialist
Marketing Product Specialist
Marketing Product Specialist Position
Marketing Stuff Creator
Online Marketing Manager
Partner Marketing Manager
Presentationist
Product Designer
Product Marketing and Communications Manager
Product Marketing Manager
Senior Manager Channel Marketing Operations
Senior Product Marketing Manager
Senior UX Designer
Social Editor
Social Media Campaign Assoc
Sr. Marketing Manager
Travel Writer
UX/UI Designer
Web Developer and Technical Marketer
 

I’m not interested in working for a company that employs ninjas, rockstars, or evangelists. (I’m a writer so of course I take myself far too seriously for that.) And, while I’m still trying to sort this out, it also seems to strike me as coded language that says “startup,” or “we hire only millennials.” While I am a millennial, I’m at the far end of that classification and jobs like these may also be encoded subconsciously as “low paying.” Either way, I always seem to find a reason not to apply.

The jobs that I find myself most excited about and usually interview with are the positions that:

Are titled Director of Marketing or Marketing Director

This is the same title as my previous title.
60% of the interviews I’ve had are for jobs with this title.

Include emphasis in communications, branding, marketing strategy, or product management in the job description

Include a social good aim/connection

It’s important to me. Like one company said during an interview, “We don’t just build websites that sell deodorant anymore. They have to make the world better.” (I suppose you could argue that deodorant makes the world better.)

Allow for remote work

I’ve been a remote worker for a year now and I’ve decided the modern office is where the wifi is.

Some use the term digital nomad to describe this, but for me I really love the freedom to walk my dog when I take breaks.

Remote work is also about balance, so I utilize a coworking space as well.

 

The companies that are the most impressive to me incorporate job titles into their overall business strategy. It’s not merely semantics, it’s starting with why and knowing that something as seemingly trivial as a job title, might attract the right candidate.